The Rooney Effect? The Rise of the Male Hair Transplant

After England’s less than inspiring World Cup defeat, it’s impossible to avoid hearing about the country’s only goal scorer, Wayne Rooney. Flashback to three years ago, however, and the England team’s not-quite golden boy was in the news for a very different reason; his first, and very well-publicised, hair transplant.

“I was going bald at 25 why not?” tweeted the England and Manchester United forward in an honest announcement to his millions of fans in 2011. And now it seems more of those suffering are beginning to take that attitude, with UK clinics noting a huge rise in the number of men undergoing the treatment each year.

Wayne Rooney's fuller locks during an England match

Wayne Rooney’s fuller locks during an England match
*All images, videos and testimonials are based on the personal experiences of our patients and represent individual body shapes and results. Results may vary from person to person. All testimonials are provided voluntarily by our patients and clients and all photos and videos have been consented to and have not been altered in any way.

At The Private Clinic, we’ve already seen a 120% increase in the amount of hair transplants that have taken place in the first half of 2014, and it’s hard to deny the effect celebrity endorsement can have. Dan Jude, journalist and  hair transplant patient at The Private Clinic, wrote in Grazia magazine a few weeks ago that Rooney’s declaration had been the first glimmer of hope he’d had since beginning to lose his hair as a teenager, while TV presenter Martin Roberts  said in the Daily Express of his transplant “When you [see] people like Wayne Rooney and James Nesbitt being so open about having help, you do think why not?”.

The approval of household names certainly helps to break down any stigma that might have been associated with talking about hair loss treatment, but it is perhaps the huge advancement of hair transplant methods that has encouraged more people to go ahead with it. Better technology and pioneering surgeons have meant that hair transplant surgery today is quicker, easier, and more effective than ever before.

The Private Clinic uses a method called FUE (Follicular Unit Extraction) which works by transplanting individual hair follicles, rather than surgically extracting actual strips of scalp, from healthy parts of the scalp or body (normally the back of head) to the chosen area. The entire procedure is performed under local anaesthetic and there are no stitches required, meaning significantly less recovery time and hardly any visible scarring (though this does depend entirely on your surgeon’s skills). As well as being minimally invasive, however, FUE also yields impressive results; working with individual hairs means that only the strongest follicles are selected and transplanted into the natural direction of your hair growth.

FUE_Hair_transplant_Dr_Raghu_reddy

Before and after FUE hair transplant by Dr Raghu Reddy
*All images, videos and testimonials are based on the personal experiences of our patients and represent individual body shapes and results. Results may vary from person to person. All testimonials are provided voluntarily by our patients and clients and all photos and videos have been consented to and have not been altered in any way.

We’re proud that The Private Clinic’s own surgeons Dr ReddyDr Luca De Fazio, Dr Mark Tam, Mr Michail Mouzakis and Mr Doraisami Mohan have been behind some of these hair transplant advancements, and their experience is reflected in their work.

6.5 million men in the UK are affected by baldness and hair loss, but thanks to a careful combination of the procedure becoming more talked about and medical professionals constantly improving it, an increasing number are discovering that they don’t have to put up with it. If only we could say the same for England’s football scores…

For more information on hair loss and hair transplants, visit our site.

Keep an eye out for another account of Dan Jude’s hair transplant in FHM this August and his results in early 2015.

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